Sunday, October 19, 2008

Making Korean Food and Playing Korean Games


Today I went over to my partner teacher's (Judy) house. She taught me how to make some Korean food. First we made one of my favorite Korean dishes Tteokbokki. It is pieces of tteok and fish cake and veggies in a spicy red pepper sauce. It's actually really easy and I can't wait to make my own.Then we also made takbokum. Similar to tteokbokki because the sauce is similar. There are also many veggies in it. This one has chicken and potatoes in it as well though. It was amazing, of course.
While I was at her house she taught me how to play the traditional Korean game Hwatu. In South Korea, (Korean: 화투, Hanja: 花鬪) the most common game is "Go Stop" (Korean: 고스톱) [2] or "Sutda" (Korean: 섯다). In South Korea, Hwatu is very common to be played during special holidays such as the Lunar New Years, and also during the Korean holiday of 추석(Chuseok). Playing Go Stop during the family gatherings of the holidays have become a culture to Koreans for many years. It is fun but a very difficult and complicated game. I did win a couple of times but I don't even know how I did it. Oh well she promised that I would get a chance to play more and I can get better.
We also went to the Hospital today because Judy's friend had a baby yesterday. She is so cute.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Are you able to cook much at your apartment? The food looks quite delicious.
-Kevin
P.S. I'm glad that if I ever went to Korea I could still enjoy some Heinz ketchup.

Amanda Lenz said...

Kevin, yeah I can cook at my place I just don't have an oven, so no baking. Plus it is sorta difficult to get ingredients because I don't know what I am buying and eating Korean food in restaurants is cheep so many times we just go out to eat...The food was quite delicious. Heinz is a staple!

Anonymous said...

Have you taught anyone how to play crazy rummy? love ya aunt debbie

Amanda Lenz said...

Aunt Debbie, I am gonna teach Judy and her twin sister Erica how to play crazy rummy eventually. They really want to come home with me for Christmas 2009 so I told them that they have to know it so they can play with us! Right now we are working with a culture that doesn't generally play cards and a slight language barrier.